Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Featured Guest Author: The Preacher’s Son by Lisa Henry & J.A. Rock with Guest Post & Giveaway

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We are happy to welcome Lisa Henry to Sinfully today to celebrate the release of her and J.A. Rock’s new title, The Preacher’s Son. See what Lisa has to say about writing Nate’s faith and don’t forget to enter the giveaway.

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Hi, Lisa Henry here! When J.A. and I set out to write The Preacher’s Son—a story of a young man whose father runs a conversion camp—we were both sure of one thing: we didn’t want Nate to reject his faith in order to embrace his identity as a gay man. Because while his father’s principles are harmful and dangerous, even though they come wrapped in words of love and support, we wanted Nate’s journey to be one of reconciliation: to his identity, to his past, and to his own personal faith. We wanted to approach that faith respectfully despite out own beliefs.

I am not a religious person. When I was five I told my mother I wasn’t going back to Sunday School. I’d had an asthma attack, and blamed Jesus since he was apparently the guy in charge. My mother, probably thinking of the poor earnest young people trying to run the class, didn’t force the issue.

When I was about twelve, my grandfather passed away. He was not a nice man, but I was very bothered by the idea that he might be in hell all the same. My best friend at the time was Catholic, and I’d been going to a few services because I was interested in all the ceremonial stuff, and I liked the ritualistic aspect of it, and—one exciting Easter—terrifying cranky Father Carroll gave the entire service in Latin. Latin!!!! It all seemed very exotic and mysterious!

Meanwhile, I guess, all this stuff about my grandfather was still bubbling away in the back of my brain and worrying me, so I decided to ask an expert. When I went with Kate to the church that afternoon after school, I was hoping it would be Father Terry who was there. He was young and cool and wore Batman t-shirts. Instead—just my luck—it was scary Father Carroll. All the Catholic kids were terrified of him. He was old, and short-tempered, and intimidating as hell. But I summoned up my courage and approached him anyway.

I don’t know what he thought of this awkward nominally Protestant kid waylaying him in the aisle and blurting out this stuttering question about her grandfather and how horrible he sometimes was—but not all the time—and was he really in hell now, because the Bible says—

I still remember what he said to me:

“God is our father, and what loving father would send His children into hell?”

And I think that was the most astonishing answer he could have given me. This man, who had the reputation for being such a stickler for the traditional Catholic party line, and he was telling me that God was love. As simple as that. And as profound too.

For the rest of my time in that town I still hung out with mostly Catholic kids, and sometimes went along to church as well but, unlike my friends, I no longer groaned when Father Carroll stepped up to perform the service instead of cool Father Terry with his Adidas sticking out from underneath his robes. Father Carroll became my favourite, with all his compassion and love hidden under that cranky mask.

Even though I’ve ended up an atheist, that will never take away from the message of hope that Father Carroll gave me back when I was a worried kid. He didn’t owe me that. I wasn’t one of his congregation, and he probably didn’t even know my name. And even if I don’t share his faith, I respect it, and I’ll always be grateful to him for the words he said to me that day and the comfort I took in them.

And when it came to writing a book about a man whose faith is important to him, that’s what I tried to remember. Nate’s faith isn’t mine either, but to him it’s real and it’s solid, and it’s necessary. And I like to think that Nate ends in a place where his beliefs are a strength, and not a source of conflict, and that he has discovered the same simple, profound faith that Father Carroll once shared with a stammering kid all those years ago: that God is love.

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The Preacher’s Son

Lisa Henry & J.A. Rock

Macintosh HD:Users:Jen:Desktop:a5055e9c-a738-4efb-bc63-48cdbdaa10ec.jpgRelease Date ~ 16th January 2018

Genre ~ Contemporary M/M Romance

Rating

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Synopsis

Jason Banning is a wreck. His leg’s been blown to hell in Afghanistan, his boyfriend just left him and took the dog, and now he’s back in his hometown of Pinehurst, Washington, a place that holds nothing but wretched memories…and Nathan Tull. Nathan Tull, whose life Jason ruined. Nathan Tull, who will never believe Jason did what he did for a greater good. Nathan Tull, whose reverend father runs a gay conversion therapy camp that Jason once sought to bring down—at any cost.
Nathan Tull is trying to live a quiet life. Four years ago, when Nate was a prospective student visiting UW Tacoma, his world collapsed when senior Jason Banning slept with him, filmed it, and put the footage online. A painful public outing and a crisis of faith later, Nate has finally begun to heal. Cured of the “phantoms” that plagued him for years, he now has a girlfriend, a counselor job at his dad’s camp, and the constant, loving support of his father.

But when he learns Jason is back in town, his carefully constructed identity begins to crumble. As desperate to reconcile his love for God with his attraction to men as Jason is to make sense of the damage he’s done, Nate finds himself walking a dangerous line. On one side lies the righteous life he committed himself to in the wake of his public humiliation. On the other is the sin he committed with Jason Banning, and the phantoms that won’t let him be. But is there a path that can bridge those two worlds—where his faith and his identity as a gay man aren’t mutually exclusive?

And can he walk that path with the man who betrayed him?


::: Debra’s Review :::


Purchase Link

AMAZON GLOBAL LINK 

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Meet Lisa Henry & J.A. Rock

Lisa Henry likes to tell stories, mostly with hot guys and happily ever afters.

Lisa lives in tropical North Queensland, Australia. She doesn’t know why, because she hates the heat, but she suspects she’s too lazy to move. She spends half her time slaving away as a government minion, and the other half plotting her escape.

She attended university at sixteen, not because she was a child prodigy or anything, but because of a mix-up between international school systems early in life. She studied history and English, neither of them very thoroughly.

She shares her house with too many cats, a dog, a green tree frog that swims in the toilet, and as many possums as can break in every night. This is not how she imagined life as a grown-up.

WEBSITE | GOODREADS | FACEBOOK | TWITTER

AMAZON AUTHOR PAGE


J.A. Rock is the author of over twenty LGBTQ romance, suspense, and horror novels, as well as an occasional contributor to HuffPo Queer Voices. J.A.’s books have received Lambda Literary and INDIEFAB Award nominations, and The Subs Club received the 2016 National Leather Association-International Pauline Reage Novel Award. 24/7 was named one of the best books of 2016 by Kirkus Reviews. J.A. lives in Chicago with an extremely judgmental dog, Professor Anne Studebaker.

WEBSITE | BLOG | TWITTER | FACEBOOK

AMAZON AUTHOR PAGE

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Giveaway

For your chance to win an eBook from the backlist of Lisa Henry, J.A. Rock or any of their co-written titles, please leave a comment below.

Please leave your email address with your comment so we can contact you.

Good Luck!

31 comments:

  1. Thank you for the interesting post, Lisa. I'm not a religious person either, I decided I'd had enough with Catholic hypocrisy when I was twelve, but I am always interested in reading how other people live their faith... That's why you new book sounds so good to me!
    susanaperez7140(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. Thank you! Religion has always interested me a lot, even though it's not something I can put my faith into.

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  2. Intolerant religious people drive me crazy. Sometimes I have to skim over parts of a book because they make me so angry.
    jlshannon74 at gmail.com

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  3. This book sounds intense- I'd love to read an excerpt.

    psshepherd@earthlink.net

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    1. There will be excerpts coming up in the blog tour!

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  4. Thank you for the post. Faith and religion are tough subjects. I look forward to reading this book.
    jczlapin@gmail.com

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    1. I agree they're tough subjects, but I find them fascinating to explore.

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  5. This sounds like a wonderful thought provoking book and can't wait to read.
    LNourse@hotmail.com

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    Replies
    1. We definitely tried to tackle some big topics in this one, and I hope we managed it!

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  6. Thank you for the insightful post. Religious fervor can be blamed on so much of the pain we're experiencing in the world...wars, brutality, murder...I can't understand how some feel they are the ones to decide what is 'true' for everyone else. I guess they never read the New Testament!

    dfair1951@gmail.com

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    1. It's a shame that the people talking the loudest often seem to be the least tolerant.

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    2. Congratulations - you are our lucky winner of this post. An email is one its way to you. Happy reading, Mark :-)

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  7. This book sounds great. It's definitely on my TBR list. Thanks!
    darcyfifield@comcast.net

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  8. Thank you for the post. I've added it to my wishlist.
    humhumbum AT yahoo DOT com

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  9. great post today..i agree that religion is a hard subject to discuss. I know what I believe but would never push on others.
    jmarinich33 at aol dot com

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  10. Thanks for your little story. The book sounds great.
    heath0043 at gmail dot com

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  11. Thanks for sharing. I read the review here the other day and this book sounds great. It's on my goodreads to-read list now!

    -Lauren
    www.shootingstarsmag.net

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    1. Thank you! We hope it's a thought-provoking read!

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  12. Sounds great. Thanks for the chance.

    jenniesullivan834@yahoo.com.au

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  13. Congrats on the new release! Sounds like a good book. colby69@verizon.net

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  14. Congrats & thanks for sharing. I have a number of gay friends whose faith is important to them, my college roommate for one. It's easier now, but back in the day (80s) there weren't many options, and the Metropolitan Community Church provided a way for them to keep the faith, so to speak, much as you wanted for Nate. - Purple Reader,
    TheWrote [at] aol [dot] com

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  15. interesting thoughts....I'm not really into religion and tend to avoid books that mention religion unless the blurb drags me in anyway!

    leetee2007(at)hotmail(dot)com

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  16. Good post. Religion✔ gay men✔ should be interesting.
    fides fox(at) gmail (dot) com

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  17. I consider myself closer to the agnosticism than the atheism, but mostly I'm a firm believer that faith is such a personal thing that has to be respected, but also has to stay personal, in the sense that no people, religious as much as a-religious, shouldn't try to impose their point of view to others.

    Congrats on the new release and on taking the chance to write on this subject.

    feobz (AT) hotmail (DOT) com

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    1. Obviously too much negations in the the same sentence... Please read "No people SHOULD try to impose..."

      And my email is actually foebz (AT) hotmail (DOT) com

      I probably should go back to bed... too bad it's time to go work now lol.

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