Friday, March 25, 2016

Blog Tour: Jury of One by Charlie Cochrane includes Guest Post & Giveaway.

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Please join us in welcoming the very lovely Charlie Cochrane to Sinfully today as she celebrates the release of her latest book in the Lindenshaw Mysteries… Jury of One. There is also a fabulous giveaway, so don’t forget to leave a comment for your chance to win.

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To listen or not to listen?

I’ve always been a fan of audio books and audio versions of stories. I suspect it goes back to childhood days when I used to sneak a little red transistor radio to bed and listen to drama, comedy and quizzes beneath the covers. (Wasn’t I a rebel?)

And now, at times when there’s a ton of stuff to do on the PC or when there’s tedious domestic duties (painting the ceiling, anyone?) to be done, audio versions of favourite tales are a fantastic form of entertainment. Patrick Tull’s hugely entertaining readings of the Patrick O’Brian books or my copies of the Ian Carmichael radio adaptations of the Lord Peter Wimsey novels have enlivened many a routine task. (Ian Carmichael’s mellifluous tones, especially with Sarah Badel as Harriet Vane could soothe many a savage breast.)

Of course there are drawbacks. We all know how we expect certain characters to sound, so if what we hear doesn’t match up we can be disappointed. (The original radio version of Lord of the Rings was brilliant in much of its casting, especially Ian Holm as Frodo, but its Boromir never worked for me. Far too rural.) On the other hand, we can still picture the characters and settings as we’ve pictured them in our heads, so there’s no “Bertie Wooster never looked like that!” disillusionment.

Sometimes the readings can add to my enjoyment, hearing the lines spoken with expression rather than my just reading them leading to “Oh, so that’s what it meant” moments. On the other hand, hearing something can open cans of worms. The best actors/narrators in the world struggle to cover up bad dialogue or poor plotting. Several books I’ve decided to give a second chance to by transferring to audio form have still not got past first base, with maybe the exception of Forester’s “The Commodore”, which was better heard while cleaning the kitchen floor than read in bed.

So, tell me. Do you like listening to stories? And what floats your boat/gets your goat?

(And talking of audio, the blog tour prize is a download of the audio version of Lessons in Love!)

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Jury of One

Charlie Cochrane

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Publisher: Riptide Publishing

Release: 21st March 2016

Genre: M/M (murder / mystery)

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Rating

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Synopsis

Inspector Robin Bright is enjoying a quiet Saturday with his lover, Adam Matthews, when murder strikes in nearby Abbotson, and he’s called in to investigate. He hopes for a quick resolution, but as the case builds, he’s drawn into a tangled web of crimes, new and old, that threatens to ensnare him and destroy his fledgling relationship.

Adam is enjoying his final term teaching at Lindenshaw School, and is also delighted to be settling down with Robin at last. Only Robin doesn’t seem so thrilled. Then an old crush of Adam’s shows up in the murder investigation, and suddenly Adam is yet again fighting to stay out of one of Robin’s cases, to say nothing of trying to keep their relationship from falling apart.

Between murder, stabbings, robberies, and a suspect with a charming smile, the case threatens to ruin everything both Robin and Adam hold dear. What does it take to realise where your heart really lies, and can a big, black dog hold the key?

::: REVIEW :::

Purchase Links

Riptide

 AMAZON GLOBAL LINK

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Book 1: The Best Corpse for the Job

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Author: Charlie Cochrane

Rating: 4 stars

BUY ON AMAZON

Riptide

Synopsis

Tea and sympathy have never been so deadly.

Schoolteacher Adam Matthews just wants to help select a new headteacher and go home. The governors at Lindenshaw St Crispin’s have already failed miserably at finding the right candidate, so it’s make or break this second time round. But when one of the applicants is found strangled in the school, what should have been a straightforward decision turns tempestuous as a flash flood in their small English village.

Inspector Robin Bright isn’t thrilled to be back at St. Crispin’s. Memories of his days there are foul enough without tossing in a complicated murder case. And that handsome young teacher has him reminding himself not to fraternize with a witness. But it’s not long before Robin is relying on Adam for more than just his testimony.

As secrets amongst the governors emerge and a second person turns up dead, Robin needs to focus less on Adam and more on his investigation. But there are too many suspects, too many lies, and too many loose ends. Before they know it, Robin and Adam are fighting for their lives and their hearts.

::: MARK’S REVIEW :::

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Meet Charlie Cochrane

As Charlie Cochrane couldn't be trusted to do any of her jobs of choice—like managing a rugby team—she writes, with titles published by Carina, Samhain, Bold Strokes, MLR, Riptide and Lethe.

She’s a member of the Romantic Novelists’ Association, Mystery People, International Thriller Writers Inc and is on the organising team for UK Meet. She regularly appears with The Deadly Dames.

FACEBOOK | WEBSITE | TWITTER | GOODREADS | BLOG

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Giveaway

Leave a comment for a chance to win a download of Lessons in Love (Cambridge Fellows Mysteries #1) in audio! Entries close at midnight, Eastern time, on March 26, 2016. Contest is NOT restricted to U.S. entries. Thanks for following the tour, and don’t forget to leave your contact info!

26 comments:

  1. I love listening to audiobooks! As a general rule, I listen to them when I go on a trek or when I'm cleaning/organising stuff at home. With an audiobook on, an otherwise tedious task turns into an enjoyable experience! ;)
    susanaperez7140(at)gmail(dot)com

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  2. I love audiobooks and can't imagine life without them. They are essential for driving any distance (and can be borrowed from the library if you do a lot of miles). But for me they're most useful when I'm trying to sleep. I listen to my Georgette Heyer Regency romances, which I almost know by heart, with a sleep timer of 30 minutes. They engage my mind enough to stop me thinking but not enough to keep me awake. I can always put on another 30 minutes if it doesn't work straight away! Great for the middle of the night in particular.

    Finally, if someone you know has to go into hospital, audiobooks can save their sanity in a noisy ward. Not only do they block out the sound, but people will leave them alone when they spot the headphones. And listening to a good story is a real mood-enhancer, too. Just load the Audible app on an iPad or phone, and download a couple of books.

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    1. I had never thought of the hospital aspect. What a great idea. xx

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  3. I'm a junkie for Audiobooks, I admit it. I have like over 300 in my audible library (and that doesn't count ones I've bought from other sources or have on CD). Back in my fanfic days (way before m/m audio was a thing) I used to devour podfic of my favorite slash stories. Heck Some days, I'll take the Kindle-text-Speech function. Seriously, I mostly listen to Audio during my commute (or when I'm driving anywhere really) and sometimes at work. But I will find myself listening at home as well.

    I like to read along (I suppose what Amazon refers to as 'immersion' reading, but whatever.). I very rarely only have one version of a book. I usually get the ebook first ('cause you know it's usually released first) then the audio.

    I will admit, that narrators due make a difference. A bad narrator can ruin a good book. But on the other hand, than can make an awesome book come even more alive. Then there's the awkward 'narrator shift'. You know when your reading a series and the narrators change in the middle and not only do the voices sound slightly different but some words are pronounced different. Sometimes it's not so much that one is better or worse than the other, it's just the change that is jarring, especially if you're listing back to back. The first time I really noticed this was in listening to Lynn Flewelling's NightRunner Series. Books 1-3 were Narrated by Raymond Todd, and Books 4-7 by Adam Danoff, and that shift between book 3 and 4 was jarring, especially in a fantasy with certain words that, on the page you weren't sure exactly how to pronounce, and having two separate narrators tackle them different was interesting to say the least.

    But, as a general rule, unless there's something I personally find grating about the narrator, I do tend to prefer Audio. Obviously every book can't be turned into an audio, but if I'm reading a series in audio, and a new book comes out, I'll be more likely to wait until it releases in audio as well to read/listen to it (even if I buy both versions). I'm in this position presently with THIRDS #6. The ebook has been released (and I've bought it), but I listened to books 1-5 in audio so I'm kind of reluctant to just 'read' book 6. Am I an audio book snob? Probably. :)

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    1. Nothing wrong with being an audio book connoisseur (let's say that instead of snob *g*)

      I love all your points about change of narrator, etc. Some I hadn't thought of but others really struck a chord. Harriet Vane was played on TV by an excellent actress, but her voice didn't match the description of it in the books. Very distressing.

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  4. I listen to many audiobooks. My favorite narrator is Susan Erickson for her work on the In Death novels by J.D. Robb. What I hate is that most just have one narrator and some do terrible voices for characters of the opposite sex. Erickson does a great Roarke and I actually her her voices in my head when I read a paper copy of these books.

    acm05atjuno.com

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    1. *nods* I'd rather have them not attempt the voice at all and just read it 'plain' if that makes sense.

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  5. I haven't gotten into audio books yet, but keep meaning to give it a try. "Lessons in Love" would be a great way for me to get into it...I love that story! :-)

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  6. I've become a mad audiobook listening fool in the last couple of years. Got the 24 credits yearly subscription on Audible and get the daily deal letter every day - an audiobook for the price of a fancy coffee? yes please!

    I do recall having an abridged version of H.G. Wells The Time Machine on tape when I was a kid, and played it until it wore out. And I recently, when going through old stuff, found an abridged reading of The Valley of Fear, narrated by Christopher Lee. Before he was Sir Christopher, so must be quite old. :D Nowadays I won't have any truck with abridged versions. However long the book, I want the whole thing. The longest I've listened to so far is Stephen King's The Stand, which is just under 48 hours long.

    I started out with Audible getting books I'd already read, but have widened my horizons there. Some I listened to in audio first and then read. Some I might never read. I listened to The Martian audiobook recently and I have the feeling that audiobook is a better medium for that than text, as so much of it is the lead character's accounts and reports of what's going on, which are meant to be recordings of him speaking, not typing stuff. So having it read by a narrator makes much more sense. I might read the book at some point, but get the feeling I'll always prefer the audio. Oh and IO have the movie to watch too. That's another thing I've done with some books - tried to see it in all its forms. Like The Talented Mr Ripley. I read the book. Then listened to the audio. Also listened to a BBC radio dramatisation of the whole series of books, and watched the movie of it. That's kind of fun.

    Anyway, enough wittering. I'm an audiobook fan and I think about one quarter to one third of the books I get through in a year are audio. It's only going upwards. Thanks to that daily deal I have several in the queue.

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    1. Not wittering at all. There have been some great comments here - getting me thinking. (And slavering over the thought of Christopher Lee narrating - what a voice!)

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  7. i havent listened to any audiobooks as of yet ..I am unsure if I would like it or not but will try them

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    1. I suspect they're what we'd call a bit Marmite' here. You'd either love them or hate them.

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  8. I have not yet listened to an audiobook. I did hear a very small tidbit of one, by accident, on YouTube. Didn't like it; the speaker was too slow and had odd ways of voicing different characters, but I suspect it has everything to do with the narrator. For me, listening to a story is for bedtime, but I'm "old" and admittedly old-fashioned. If the narrator were really talented, then it may be something I'd consider. I tend to use my drive time or otherwise busy time listening to music, mainly because the books I enjoy should not be overheard by my 10 year-old nor my 70 year-old housemates, lol. Best of luck with the new release!

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    1. See comment above about Marmite. Funny how what works so well for someone doesn't work for another. :)

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  9. I have not yet listened to an audiobook. I did hear a very small tidbit of one, by accident, on YouTube. Didn't like it; the speaker was too slow and had odd ways of voicing different characters, but I suspect it has everything to do with the narrator. For me, listening to a story is for bedtime, but I'm "old" and admittedly old-fashioned. If the narrator were really talented, then it may be something I'd consider. I tend to use my drive time or otherwise busy time listening to music, mainly because the books I enjoy should not be overheard by my 10 year-old nor my 70 year-old housemates, lol. Best of luck with the new release!

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  10. I don't really have a device to listen to audio books except for my computer so I can only listen when I'm at home. But it's true, cleaning the floors or the bathroom or washing dishes is much nicer when I'm listening to a good book.

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    1. Yes - while modern technology is great, it has in some ways narrowed our options. I don't even have a CD player in my car!

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  11. I love audiobooks! A good narrator is what makes/breaks a book in my opinion. I've also found I really don't enjoy listening to women narrators (even if it's a M/F book) and also find male narrators who have a nasal twang to be a total turnoff as well

    leetee2007(at)hotmail(dot)com

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    1. Oh, yes. I have an audio of saki's stories, read by a woman. She has a great voice, but not for his stories, not least because he's a bit of a misogynist.

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  12. I absolutely love audiobooks! I listen while driving or doing prep work in the kitchen. Sometimes the narrator's mispronunciation of words do drive me batty but I can move on.

    ree.dee.2014 (at) gmail (at) com

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    1. Oh yes. Mispronounciation drives me bonkers.

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  13. I never took the leap to audiobooks as english is not my mothertongue and I'm a much better english reader than english speaker...
    I thought I'd try my first one listening to the book while reading the same one on my ereader (kind of like a subtitled movie), hopefully starting with Lessons in Love that is on my TBR list for some time now ;-)
    Thanks for the chance!

    foebz (at) hotmail (dot) com

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    1. That sounds a great idea. My kids used to do a similar thing when they were younger.

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