Tuesday, July 07, 2015

Featured Guest Author: Jay Northcote talks Labels…. includes Giveaway

Jay Northcote

floral-page-divider

Labels

Jay Northcote

It seems to me that there are pros and cons to labels, whether in the LGBTQ+ community or in other areas of our lives. Labels can give a person a sense of identity and of belonging, and if you find a label that feels like a good fit for yourself, that can be helpful in understanding who you are and finding your place in the world.

But labels don’t suit everyone. We’ve all heard the phrase ‘labels are for boxes, not for people.’ Some people don’t want to be pigeonholed. Sometimes, whatever label we’ve previously adopted, we might find ourselves in a situation where that label no longer fits. Or, for some, the labels never really feel as though they’re an exact fit in the first place.

In Helping Hand, Jez identifies as bisexual—loosely, although his previous experience with boys is pretty limited. His friend and housemate, Mac, is straight... or so Jez (and Mac) have always assumed. When they start experimenting in a casual way, they’re both surprised by the feelings that develop between them. When Jez turns to Josh (another housemate and the ‘resident gay’), Josh has this advice for him.

HH_quote

What do you think? Are labels really only for boxes, or can they be useful for people too?

floral-page-divider

Helping Hand by Jay Northcote

91VMUQ5mpnL._SL1500_

Published ~ 26th June 2015

Genre ~ M/M Contemporary Romance

Rating

1c1c1c1c1ca

goodreads-add-to532

Synopsis

Wanking with a mate isn’t gay—as long as you keep your hands to yourself.
Jez Fielding and James MacKenzie—Big Mac to his mates—are in their second year at uni. After partying too hard last year, they make a pact to rein themselves in. While their housemates are out drinking every weekend, Jez and Mac stay in to save cash and focus on their studies.
When Jez suggests watching some porn together, he isn’t expecting Mac to agree to it. One thing leads to another, and soon their arrangement becomes hands-on rather than hands-off. But falling for your straight friend can only end badly, unless there’s a chance he might feel the same.

:: REVIEW ::

Purchase Links

AMAZON GLOBAL LINK | ARe | SMASHWORDS

floral-page-divider

Meet Jay Northcote

Jay lives just outside Bristol in the West of England, with her husband, two children, and two cats.

She comes from a family of writers, but she always used to believe that the gene for fiction writing had passed her by. She spent years only ever writing emails, articles, or website content. One day, she decided to try and write a short story–just to see if she could–and found it rather addictive. She hasn’t stopped writing since.

WEBSITE | TWITTER | FACEBOOK | FACEBOOK AUTHOR PAGE | JAY'S BOOKS

floral-page-divider

Giveaway

Jay Northcote is gifting to one lucky reader an E-book from her back list (excludes Helping Hand) Enter the Rafflecopter below for your chance to win.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

20 comments:

  1. Josh tells it exactly like I see it!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I do not think you can label people...Although you can loosely talk about yourself using general labels as conventional, audacious, heterosexual, open-minded... Each person is a very special entity and needs a unique definition.
    The book sounds great. Thank you for the giveaway

    ReplyDelete
  3. I think there is a difference between labeling yourself and having someone else try to label you. As you said the label can identify you as part of a group. This can give you a sense of not only belonging but of collective power too. Look at what the collective power of the LGBTQ community and their supporters accomplished in the US with the SCOTUS ruling! I think problems come when other people try to label you. It is also important to remember that labels are fluid and hopefully a strict label will never be used to dictate the direction of a person's life. BTW - Thanks for the giveaway!

    ReplyDelete
  4. i dont like labels..people are people

    ReplyDelete
  5. I don't like labels but find that no matter how hard you try everyone is labeled...

    ReplyDelete
  6. Labels are great for some people, helping them make sense of who they are and find others to be with, and for others it's restrictive, confines them to a box that doesn't mean a whole lot. I can definitely see how they've helped, and I can definitely see how they've hindered. I respect both those perspective and all the feelings along that spectrum. Ours isn't to decide for someone else what they need and want. We should just be understanding and respectful of someone's decision about them. Thanks for sharing with us, Jay!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Labels are fine, as long as everyone realises that they're not tattoos, you can change your label at any time.
    Curly

    ReplyDelete
  8. I think everyone labels people before they get to know them - the "red headed geek that wears glasses" is the way your mind remembers someone until you learn who they are - their name, personality etc

    ReplyDelete
  9. I think we all use labels. It becomes a problem when we see the labels and not the person.

    ReplyDelete
  10. HI, Jay! Congrats on the new release. I haven't gotten to pick it up yet, but should be able to next payday. Oh, my soapbox of late... I'm not sure I'm at all comfortable with labels in any fashion, too many negative coronations. From orientation, color, religion, politics, to even describing an individual in general. We are all individuals and though we are quick to judge and assign a label to others, we shouldn't use a label just so we have an excuse to treat another differently. I guess when it comes to orientation, yes I'm straight, but as long as you are happy and love the person you are with does it really matter? Okay, stepping down now. LOL Can you tell I've been defending others for a few months?

    ReplyDelete
  11. I think we do need labels but at the end of the day we're all human. We may think we don't need it but labels help to simplify stuff and they aren't always what they seem. We make labels what they mean...

    ReplyDelete
  12. If a label makes people feel like they belong with others in a shared community, that can be great. It becomes bad when it's a way to limit rather than include.

    --Trix

    ReplyDelete
  13. Don't believe in labelling people.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I believe people use labels and at times they are okay but we all need to remember to look behind the labels and see the real person inside.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Almost everybody labels people, like it or not, but it seems like life would be better if we didn't.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I think whether we want to admit it most of us label people. I think the part that gets problematic is when we only think of them with that label or labels. People don't fit neatly into any category, that's what makes life interesting. We are all different and labels are limited.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Sigh. I dislike labels because once you're labeled people rarely see beyond that. To some, I'm a tottering, silver-haired widow with wrinkly skin and bad feet. They make snap decisions based on my appearance, noting my orthopedic shoes and unfashionable clothes. I'm not in their "tribe" and dismiss me.

    Cutting to the chase, we are individuals with strengths and weaknesses. Putting the soap box away, now.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Hi Jay, I love your quote in the blue box. I was reading about Agron and Nasir (from Spartacus) lately and the 50 Greatest Gay TV characters said something similar about Agron and it is a good summary:
    "the culmination of ancient sexualities that put pleasure and person above gender and “pieces parts," brought to life on the small screen for all to see."
    It seems that centuries ago people didn't care what sex their lover was, it was the person they wanted. Maybe the human race can get back to that some day.

    ReplyDelete
  19. I loved Samantha Kane's Brothers in Arms series for ménage, Amy Cousins 'Off Campus', Madelyn Ellis 'Her husbands Lover' and last but not least....Alessandra Hazzards 'Just a bit Unhealthy'

    ReplyDelete
  20. I like positive labels such as mom, dad, and friend. What I don't like is when people use negative labels.

    ReplyDelete